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Posts Tagged ‘Scarlet Macaw’

We were having a great time in Belize, but our trip was about more than having fun.  It all started when we decided that we wanted to protect the wintering habitat for “our” Wood Thrushes.  But, where do our birds winter?  This spring, we will participate in a project that will tell us.  We suspect that our birds go to Belize, so that’s where we headed.  We wanted this to be a volunteer trip with real accomplishments, so Matt Jeffery of National Audubon’s International Alliances Program created a trip plan that would allow us to help our friends at Belize Audubon.

Belize Aububon Society office in Belize City

Belize Aububon Society office in Belize City

The major item on our agenda was eBird training.  Last fall I entered Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary point count data for the last three years into eBird.  Now the goal is for Belize Audubon to enter their own data going forward.  eBird is new to all of the Belize Audubon staff, but our considerable  experience using eBird made this a good task for us.  Katherine Thorington prepared a PowerPoint presentation that would work with or without Internet access.

eBird training in Belize City

eBird training in Belize City

Katherine helps Dareece set up her account

Katherine helps Dareece set up her account

Katherine delivered the eBird training three times – at the Belize Audubon office in Belize City, at St. Herman’s Blue Hole National Park, and at Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary.  In Belize City and at Cockscomb we had an Internet connection, but it was intermittent (and mostly unavailable) at St. Herman’s Blue Hole.  With Katherine’s warm and friendly style, the training was a big hit.  In Belize City, we had wardens from Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary and a high school student who joined the Crooked Tree Junior Birding Club several years ago.  At all three sessions, our eBird students asked many excellent questions. They were excited about creating their own eBird accounts and getting starting entering data.

Another task assigned to us was to help with a bird survey of Burdon Canal, near Belize City. It didn’t sound like work to us – a boat ride in wonderful weather looking at gorgeous birds! But, Matt insisted that it would be helpful.

Lee Jones, Matt Jeffery, Belize Audubon staff, Forsyth Audubon birders

Lee Jones, Matt Jeffery, Belize Audubon staff, Forsyth Audubon birders

The canal and its lagoons are part of the Burdon Canal Nature Reserve.  The canal was created in the 1920’s to help farmers get crops to market without enduring risks of the open sea.  In 1992, Burdon Canal was designated as a nature reserve.

Haulover Creek on the way to the Burdon Canal

Haulover Creek on the way to the Burdon Canal

The wetlands help prevent flooding in the city from rains and provide protection from storm surges.  The beautiful red mangrove swamps and wildlife are also important for their proximity to Belize City which makes the nature reserve easily accessible.  There are some bird records, but Belize Audubon wants to improve the list to better promote the site.  It was especially helpful that Birds of Belize author Lee Jones was able to join us for the trip.  We entered all of our bird sightings into eBird.

Scarlet Macaws are breathtakingly beautiful and highly sought after by birders and tourists alike.  They are not common in Belize, but one area where they reliably are found is the small village of Red Bank, not far from Cockscomb, between January and March, when they come to feed on the sweet, ripe fruits of the ‘annato’ and ‘pole wood’ trees, which cover the hillsides.

Scarlet Macaws

Scarlet Macaws at Red Bank

Only a few years ago, it was believed that the macaws were hunted for food, but now the ‘Scarlet Macaw Group’ has been formed and it is looking for ways to protect these gorgeous birds and benefit from their survival. Belize Audubon is working with the villagers to help make Red Bank an ecotourism destination.

Climbing the Scarlet Macaw trail

Climbing the Scarlet Macaw trail

We were fortunate and saw six macaws from the road, but the traditional route is to climb a steep mountain trail – a muddy trail without switchbacks, steps or toeholds of any kind.  I was only able to “climb” the trail because our local guides held my hand and nearly pulled me up the mountainside.  We did not need to offer advice on trail improvement; watching our ascent was enough for our friends to see that a better trail would bring more visitors.  We offered advice on signage, though, and other tourist amenities.  Red Bank has tremendous potential for becoming a great birding “hot spot.”  We can’t wait to see it again in a few years.

At Cockscomb Basin - Nicasio, Kitty, Dareece, Katherine, Rebecca, Shelley, Phil

At Cockscomb Basin – Nicasio, Kitty, Dareece, Katherine, Rebecca, Shelley, Phil

Our last “work” was to have a preview of the birding trail that Cockscomb is creating near their Visitor Center and to offer advice.  They already have built trails and installed a bench and birdbath.  We offered generous amounts of both compliments and advice.  This will be another fun place to visit in a few years to see the improvements.

Wood Thrush

Wood Thrush

We saw and heard Wood Thrushes nearly everywhere we traveled, typically four or five birds during each outing.  We hope that some of them come to Forsyth County for the breeding season this spring.  Sadly, it was time to say “goodbye” to our new friends at Belize Audubon all too soon.  Meeting so many of these enthusiastic, talented, and dedicated people was the highlight of our trip.  We hope that some of them can visit us here in North Carolina, too.

Photo credits:  Phil Dickinson, Jeremy Reiskind, Katherine Thorington

This is the second in a series of five posts.
Previous post: Forsyth Audubon in Belize: River Birds and Baboons
Next post:  Forsyth Audubon in Belize:  St. Herman’s Blue Hole

 

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